Image of IWM logo with photographic background IWM Research Blog
Archive
Tag "Survivor Stories"
Image of ‘Trixie’ Inga Joseph's doll which accompanied her when she left Vienna for Britain as one of the Kindertransport refugees in June 1939

‘Trixie’ who accompanied her young owner –Inga Joseph– when she left Vienna for Britain as one of the Kindertransport refugees in June 1939. IWM EPH 3922

The Holocaust Exhibition was ten years old last year, and giving talks about its impact is a rewarding thing to do.  Visitor figures – at 7-800 a day – are still high. The subject has become mainstream after years of being marginalised, and films, tv programmes and books still appear each month with new slants, and new questions.

Today I am talking to the Sheffield branch of the Association of Jewish Refugees.  I know one of the members well – Inga Joseph, who came as a Kindertransport refugee in 1938 and it is through her that I was invited along.  Inga gave the IWM two dolls which she brought with her as a child refugee from Vienna – Trixie and Peter – and has written up her early life in three highly readable books written under the name of Ingrid Jacoby.

Read More
Image of Alicia Melamed Adams' painting Two frightened children

Alicia Melamed Adams, Two Frightened Children, c 1963, Imperial War Museum IWM ART 17458

The Muswell Hill studio is flooded with sunlight and all around are paintings of flowers in radiant reds, yellows and blues.   I have come to visit Alicia Melamed Adams, the Holocaust survivor whose paintings and whose story I wrote up as one of the chapters of Justice, Politics and Memory in Europe after the Second World War published this summerWe did the interviews in this studio a year ago, sifting through her old family photographs and going over the details of her family’s horrendous wartime ordeal.

Alicia was born Alicia Goldschlag in Boryslav, in Galicia – in Eastern Poland –  to parents who gave her and her brother Josef a happy childhood.  But during the Second World War the Nazis imposed a reign of terror, with random shootings and disappearances a daily occurrence. Alicia’s parents and brother were all murdered by the Nazis.  Her brother Josef – who had ambitions to become an architect – died in the Janowska camp in Lviv in 1942. Her parents were shot.

 

Read More