One Story, Different Voices - the bombing of Karlsruhe: Guest Blog by Linda Parker

Karlsruhe, photographed by an aircraft of the 8th Air Force. 8th Air Force bombing mission target. © IWM FRE 11839
Karlsruhe, photographed by an aircraft of the 8th Air Force. 8th Air Force bombing mission target. © IWM FRE 11839

SSN Members and researchers Linda Parker and Katherine Quinlan-Flatter share different perspectives of the British bombing of the German city of Karlsruhe, in the Second World War. In this post, Linda shares her research using British sources.

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One Story, Different Voices - the bombing of Karlsruhe: Guest Blog by Katherine Quinlan-Flatter

Karlsruhe Main Cemetery, Memorial to Victims of Air-Raid Bombing in World War II, by Erich Lipp 1955.
Karlsruhe Main Cemetery, Memorial to Victims of Air-Raid Bombing in World War II, by Erich Lipp 1955.

SSN Members and researchers Linda Parker and Katherine Quinlan-Flatter share different perspectives of the British bombing of the German city of Karlsruhe, in the Second World War. In this post, Katherine shares her research from the German point of view.

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Inscribing Memory: The ‘Spanish’ flu at North Head Quarantine Station, Australia.

North Head Quarantine Station © Hannah Mawdsley

North Head Quarantine Station has been a place of quarantine for those wishing to enter Australia since the 1830s. Situated on a headland to the North East of Sydney Harbour, it is ideally sited to monitor maritime and naval traffic. During the deadly ‘Spanish’ influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 it was particularly heavily used, to quarantine both military and civilian vessels and personnel. While held here, many passengers engaged in an activity that had been happening at this site for decades; they marked their time and presence there by inscribing on the sandstone cliffs.

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Dissecting Warsaw’s new museum of Polish Jewish history

Warsaw museum image 1

‘It took an army to make this exhibition’, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett told her audience and ‘having scholars in charge of each section had been the key to the Museum’s success’.  In May I attended a conference seven months after the opening of the core exhibition of POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. At the conclusion of the eight- year project, those involved in the Museum’s creation were keen to open debate on what had worked well and what less so, and to identify the gaps in Polish Jewish history requiring further historical effort.  The core exhibition offered a starting point for that discussion.

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